A Manager's Guide to Coaching

A Manager's Guide to Coaching

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Emerson, Brian | Loehr, Anne AMACOM, 2008 Audio summary available
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In A Manager's Guide to Coaching, authors Brian Emerson and Anne Loehr operate under the premise that without engaging employees on a human level which responds to a coach's leadership, workplace production and satisfaction are inhibited to the point of futility. The costs of recruiting and replacing employees and lost productivity during the hiring process further underscore the benefits of maximizing the skills and talents of all employees. Emerson and Loehr suggest that there are three equally important components to facing a task successfully in what they call the Success Equation: Aptitude: know-how, skills, and capacity Attitude: drive, confidence, focus, and determination Available Resources: tools, equipment, and time Attitude is the part of this equation most central to coaching. An improved attitude can counterbalance lacking resources or aptitude. The authors go on to outline a formula for successful coaching using the acronym, W.I.N. B.I.G. to help employees examine and deal with their reactions to obstacles, and get out of the way of their own success. Wondering about root cause Investigating wants Naming possible solutions Building a plan Insuring action Giving affirmation The W.I.N.B.I.G. formula is implemented once it has been determined that coaching is the appropriate action to take. Wondering about the origins of the problem and asking the questions most likely to bring about accurate and unemotional responses is the first and crucial step in this process. Investigating the desires of employees, for themselves and for the company, and naming possible solutions for those objectives erect the goals which both employer and employee pursue. Creating plans, holding the other accountable to measurable progress, and giving feedback and affirmation is how these goals are diligently carried out. The authors suggest that the coaching process proceeds in several phases: determining coachability, building awareness, and moving to action. Further, the entire process is based on gathering accurate, insightful information. Although managers can get information through their own observations and outside sources, the most productive method is through direct questioning. Finally, while the authors acknowledge that there is more than one correct method to coach, they offer principles and guidance on three important aspects of any coaching experience: the Coaching Mindset, Coaching Actions, and Coaching Tricks of the Trade. Using interactive case studies, they seek to educate managers and professionals in a variety of common management situations which require gathering knowledge, effective communication, and personal improvement.