The End of the American Century

The End of the American Century

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Schlossszein, Steven Congdon & Weed, 1990
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IN THIS SUMMARY

In order to lead in the 21st century, America must regain its competitive spirit by creating new strategic commercial, industrial, political, educational, and social policies--policies, which must constitute serious resolutions for the coming century. The West has held the irrational belief that the roots of Japan's economic growth lie entirely in its postwar recovery period. The reality is, however, that every since the Meiji Era (1888-1912) the country has been committed to protecting its national identity (in an attempt to prevent there what happened to China), and to establishing strategic industries that would enable it to compete with the West on economic terms-and ultimately to win. If America does not respond strategically to this external challenge, it may have to abdicate its present position of global leadership, as well as any future claims to world preeminence. Although Japan and East Asia have exposed America's weaknesses, America's strengths are still extraordinary: an uncompromising ideological commitment to representative democracy, liberty, and freedom, a diverse and resilient society capable of unmatched entrepreneurial vitality and skill, a market unparalleled in responsiveness, flexibility, and size, a dynamic, ethnic heterogeneity, and a, vibrant multiracial society. But, in order to restore Pax Americana, revitalization and renewal must be a priority.