Body and Soul

Body and Soul

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Roddick, Anita Crown Publishing, 1991
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IN THIS SUMMARY

When Anita opened the first Body Shop in Brighton, England, in 1976, the extent of her business acumen was the knowledge that she would have to take in £300 a week to remain open. Her only motivation for choosing the cosmetics business was irritation at the high cost of fancy packaging and the fact that one could not buy small sizes. Although she did not set out to buck the trend, it just so happened that her basic business instincts were diametrically opposed to almost every business practice of the industry:• Selling false hopes and unattainable dreams• Selling through hype• Emphasizing packaging• Animal testing• Spending millions on market research and advertising• Pushing "beauty" products• Worshipping profits• Refusing to become involved in the wider issues of the environment and the community. When the company went public in 1984, this investment was worth £4 million, it is now worth more than £140 million. The Roddicks wanted to use their new found wealth and status in the business community for the greater good. Although they realized that a function of profits was to create jobs and provide security for their employees, making more profits was not enough. Beyond that, they wanted to address the social responsibilities of business. They envisioned The Body Shop as a force for social change-as a lobbyist campaigning for environmental and human rights issues and a communicator/educator. The Roddicks try to maintain a sense of family, and hire those who care and are enthusiastic. Nonetheless, they find they must constantly fight the complacency their kind of success brings. Their aim is to create a style so forceful that it becomes a culture. Their hope for the future of The Body Shop is primarily vested in those people who will be the custodians of their culture and values.