Apple

Apple

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Carlton, Jim Times Business, 1998
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IN THIS SUMMARY

Almost every personal computer worldwide now has the distinctive look of Apple’s legendary Mac, which was the first to bring easy-to-use graphical icons and pull-down menus to the masses. Unfortunately, the company that started it all did not change in the same manner it changed the world. Now, Apple is in danger of disappearing-to becoming a footnote in history-albeit, a large one. Apple brings to life, in a manner that even the most technically illiterate person can understand, the process of designing, building, and selling computers. In 1980, Apple controlled 16 percent of all PC sales- the highest level it would ever attain- to a market that consisted heavily of hobbyists, schools, and small businesses. After IBM and the IBM-compatibles jumped in, Apple’s share fell to 6.2 percent by 1982. By then Jobs’s ego had swollen in direct proportion to Apple’s growth. His arrogant, unwavering conviction that he knew more than anyone else influenced a corporate culture that demeaned worthy competitors instead of respecting and learning from them. Since Amelio took over Apple and pronounced its problems to be "fixable," the company had lost $1.6 billion. Executives and the rank and file began leaving Apple in droves. In July, the board ousted Amelio and Jobs quickly moved to become Apple’s de facto CEO. And then in August, Jobs announced (to the initial horror of Apple loyalists) his plans for a far-reaching alliance with Microsoft. In this work, Carlton brings invaluable insight to Apple’s unique saga and the arcane PC industry like no headline or news segment ever did or could. It is a detailed and authoritative account of one of the most fascinating and instructive stories of management failure one could ever have the fortune to read, for failure teaches as much as success, if not more.