The 40+ Job Hunting Guide

The 40+ Job Hunting Guide

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Birsner, E. Patricia Prentice Hall Press, 1989
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IN THIS SUMMARY

Satisfied employees generally begin a description of their workplace by mentioning its unique or attractive benefits. Quickly, however, their comments turn to descriptions of the atmosphere, or feel, of the work environment. Employees of very dissimilar companies use similar terms to describe what makes their work places good. Friendliness, a lack of politics, and underlying fairness were some common traits cited, as were the companies' caring attitudes. There are many tools to assess companies as businesses, but few to assess them as workplaces. Even evident factors such as big salaries or benefits fail to determine whether a workplace is good. The basic factor in determining the duality of the workplace is the employer-employee relationship. Is it manufactured and manipulated in order to make money, or is it built on trust and based in reality? Employees often lose many of their rights on entering the workplace. Rights such as challenging bad decisions, representation of decision-making bodies, trial by peers, etc., are too often nonexistent. Some companies, by being committed to fairness, are changing this. The unique, self-determining, growth-oriented attributes of humans become major assets to a company where mutual trust flourishes. If employees are viewed as robots, however, the ensuing distrustful atmosphere turns these same traits to liabilities. The most significant factor influencing any workplace is the presence or absence of trust.