Summaries of the Week

Killing Marketing

Killing Marketing

Killing Marketing by Joe Pulizzi and Robert Rose explores the shift from product-centric to customer-centric marketing and reveals how companies can evolve with this shift by behaving like media companies. The authors share case studies of companies that are creating unique, content-driven experiences that inspire audience loyalty, brand engagement, and even participation in the development of new products and services.

Pulizzi, Joe
Exception to the Rule

Exception to the Rule

A common “rule” often repeated in business literature is “If you want more of a behavior, reward it; if you want less of a behavior, punish it.” This dualistic engagement/compliance approach has major limitations, however. Engagement is largely an intrinsic issue that cannot be solved with extrinsic tools. Virtue encourages prosocial behavior, which strengthens engagement and teamwork. While compliance with a set of rules is designed for a fixed world, virtue unites teams to navigate a rapidly changing world.

Rea, PhD, Peter J.
Better Together

Better Together

In Better Together, Jonathan Sposato uses both his personal experience and secondary research to explain why gender inequality is a problem in the modern working world, what can be done to mitigate it, and why building a gender-balanced workforce is critical for the future.

Sposato, Jonathan
Innovation by Design

Innovation by Design

In Innovation by Design, Thomas Lockwood and Edgar Papke explore how to apply design thinking to improve an organization’s economic, social, and environmental value. Organizations that embrace design thinking identify the right problems to solve, demonstrate empathy with collaboration, utilize accelerated learning through visualization, and integrate business model innovation. The authors investigate the similar attributes, or core qualities, that the most innovative organizations share.

Lockwood, Thomas
Creating Great Choices

Creating Great Choices

Many of our most challenging situations require us to choose between two imperfect solutions. Often, our choices are limiting, and we feel as though we must accept trade-offs to arrive at a resolution. In Creating Great Choices, Roger Martin and Jennifer Riel suggest another approach: We can arrive at truly superior outcomes by engaging in integrative thinking that results in a “third and better” choice.

Riel, Jennifer