Summaries of the Week

Unstoppable

Unstoppable

Businesspeople often have the experience of being constantly busy but feeling as though they and their companies are never truly progressing. In these situations, business is being maintained, but it does not grow, and long-term plans are either nonexistent or never seem to come to fruition. Even short-term goals, such as meeting sales targets, developing new products, or simply getting to meetings on time, can feel overwhelming. Frustration with inconsistency and a lack of focus, despite hours of exhausting work, leaves many people feeling drained.

Wilkinson, Pete
Collective Genius

Collective Genius

Many people study leadership, and many books have been written about innovation, but few scholars or books explore the connection between the two. Collective Genius by Linda A. Hill, Greg Brandeau, Emily Truelove, and Kent Lineback shows what it takes to lead innovation. Based on years of research, the authors reveal that leaders of groundbreaking innovation create places where people are willing and able to do the hard work that this type of problem solving requires. Leaders unleash people’s individual genius and harness it together to form collective genius.

Hill, Linda A.
Sticking Points

Sticking Points

For the first time in history, four generations (Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) are working alongside one another, each completely different from the others. Each new generation brings about change, and if an organization wants to survive, it cannot fight that change. Instead, it must find ways of mixing the old with the new. Generational differences have the ability to tear teams apart, but in Sticking Points, Haydn Shaw provides a practical resource for working through these differences.

Shaw, Haydn
Connect

Connect

Customers are in control of the marketing messages they receive—both the content and the delivery. They expect to have the same experiences whether they are online or in a store. As Lars Birkholm Petersen, Ron Person, and Christopher Nash make clear in Connect, when companies value customers and offer personal experiences based on their preferences, customers are more inclined to come back.

Petersen, Lars Birkholm
Risk-Based Performance Management

Risk-Based Performance Management

After the credit crisis of 2008, the business world changed dramatically. Senior leadership in most organizations faced more risk than ever and needed an effective way to manage it. In Risk-Based Performance Management, Andrew Smart and James Creelman have created a framework that helps senior management understand, manage, and control the risks facing their organizations while still gaining a competitive advantage.

Smart, Andrew