Summaries of the Week

A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating

A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating

A great negotiator does five things well: sets the stage, finds common ground, asks with confidence, embraces the pause, and knows when to leave. By mastering these steps, any individual can negotiate anything in business or in life. In A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating, former sports agent Molly Fletcher has created a road map for business professionals looking to improve their negotiation skills.

Fletcher, Molly
HBR Guide to Coaching Employees

HBR Guide to Coaching Employees

Managers today should not simply tell their employees what to do—they need teach their employees how to make decisions, solve problems, and develop skills on their own. In HBR Guide to Coaching Employees, leading experts provide advice to managers about how to coach employees to help them shape and achieve their goals. Each expert discusses topics that give managers the tools they need to better develop their personnel.

Review Editors, Harvard Business
Moms Mean Business

Moms Mean Business

In the United States alone, women are starting businesses at twice the rate of men, and many of those women are moms. In Moms Mean Business, Erin Baebler and Lara Galloway target moms who want to be entrepreneurs—and those with businesses already underway—who need support and advice on how to optimally juggle family and business concerns. The authors discuss the importance of a relatable business plan, realistic time management, continued self-care, and identifying and staying true to one’s authentic self.

Baebler, Erin
The Unfinished Leader

The Unfinished Leader

Today’s business calls for more than just CEOs and managers with fancy offices and impressive résumés. In The Unfinished Leader, David L. Dotlich, Peter C. Cairo, and Cade Cowan provide a complete and impactful assessment of leadership in the ever-changing world of business. They believe CEOs, executives, and managers are equipped with the knowledge and data essential in making the right choices in relating to employees, partners, and stakeholders.

Dotlich, David L.
Marketing High Technology

Marketing High Technology

The 1980s marketplace for microprocessors and computers might better be described as a battlefield. Companies rose and fell rapidly, attacked by both larger rivals and smaller upstarts. Commodification made it hard to differentiate products, and the falling cost of production lowered barriers to entry. In this environment, successful technology companies had to orient themselves around marketing and customers rather than continue in the tradition of simply trying to produce great engineering. In Marketing High Technology, William H.

Davidow, William H.